Several days ago, I celebrated my 33rd birthday on a beautiful beach with my family. In the recent years, I learned that this is my favourite way of celebrating. My birthday is the start of a new year for me, and I view it with great significance as I continue to write my story, adding on to the journey and learning more about myself.

The number 33 is one of my favourites, and here are three quirky ways in which the number holds personal significance for me:

  • My life path number is 33, signifying a deep connection to humanitarian causes, altruism, and leadership. I have never thought of myself as a great leader, but neither have I ever been a follower. As a Leo, natural leadership is also in my astrological chart, but I have always been more of a wallflower, quietly exploring my inner world and feeling deeply curious about the people around me.
  • I remember my mom very clearly at 33. I was 8 years old when she was 33, always a vision in beautiful feminine dresses perfectly tailored by my grandmother, with her hair piled elegantly in a perfect chignon. She never consciously tried to attract anyone’s attention, but she couldn’t help it. Once, when I introduced myself to a girl who lived in our neighbourhood and mentioned that I have a sister, she remarked, “Oh, I saw you and your sister walking together the other day. Your sister was pushing a baby in a stroller. Was she babysitting?”

“Um… No,” I replied. “The baby is my sister. The lady pushing the stroller is my mom.” I giggled as I watched my friend’s jaw drop in disbelief.

  • At 33, my father uprooted with us, his family, to a different country, leaving the rest of our family behind and embarking on a journey that has shaped our future in a remarkable way. Our world was turned upside down and I had to learn early on to navigate an extremely extroverted middle eastern society as a quiet introvert homebody. These days, I am a homebody who craves nomadic adventure, no longer terrified of speaking my mind and chatting with strangers.

Also, just because I’m a big Tolkien nerd, I am giddy at the thought that for hobbits, 33 is considered to be a ‘coming of age’ year.

I hope you will continue to follow along with me as I continue this journey and the lessons it offers. Sending gratitude to you, dear readers, for your loyal support!

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After our indoor skydiving experience, Mr. Wanderlust and I had the rest of the day wide-open before us. We had previously arranged for the children to stay with Pawel’s parents for several days, to the boys’ delight. The afternoon was full of possibility.

Although we sometimes go out on dates in the evenings or for a few hours in the middle of the day, it’s highly unusual for us to have a full day to spend at leisure. When we first started dating, we used to spend an entire afternoon wandering around the city. A bit of an insider story for Torontonians: we once started our walking journey near Yonge and Sheppard, turned west at Yonge and Bloor, and continued walking all the way to Keele Station. That’s approximately 17 km, or a three-hour walk, but we didn’t notice the passing of the time. We share a passion for touring cities by foot, and being tourists in our own city can be surprisingly fun!

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So, what were we to do at 2 p.m. on this beautiful, sweltering afternoon?

“Let’s go to the Burlington waterfront,” I suggested, and we did.

Following a wholesome lunch at a vegan restaurant, the beach was calling to us. I felt the need to take off my shoes and ground myself after hovering in a wind tunnel.

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One of my favourite pictures, taken by Mr. Wanderlust last weekend.

Our beach afternoon turned into a Lakeshore Blvd.-cruising, beach-hopping adventure. After we left Burlington, Pawel felt the Oakville pier calling to him as we drove past the marina. He careened the car into a side street and after finding the perfect parking spot close to a children’s playground, we went off to enjoy yet another beach, upon which I found a remarkable treasure.

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My friend Sheniz, whom I have actually never met in person (see: we took an online writing course and have remained in touch), had been on that beach a week earlier, where she used driftwood to create a ‘nest’ for oval-shaped rocks, the likes of which lay abundantly beneath and around the spot where I stood gazing down at the inspiration that surrounded me. On many of the rocks around the nest were written, in dark marker, inspirational quotes, some of which hold special meaning for me. My eye kept following the rocks as I bent down, and finally, my gaze froze upon a rock on which was written Sheniz’s name and information about the nest she built. Given that I had never met Sheniz in person but continue to follow her beautiful adventures on social media, and considering that I had never before visited this particular beach, the magic of the experience was palpable. I thanked Pawel for following his intuition to explore the pier, allowing serendipity to find its way to us.

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What followed next was a drive across the city to Ashbridges Bay, in the east end of Toronto — one of our favourite spots. We enjoyed a takeout dinner on the boardwalk and climbed the rocks by the water for a spectacular view of the pink-and-orange playful sparkle of the setting sun on the almost-still water. A peaceful ending to a day that we seized firmly, enjoying the ride, recreating a new version of an old favourite experience of touring with spontaneity and complete abandon, allowing ourselves to simply be there, enjoying the moment, the views, the sand beneath our toes, the cooling water, and each other’s company.

Inspiring, serendipitous experiences happen when we give ourselves permission to fully enjoy the moment, letting go of our responsibilities, of the ‘shoulds’ and ‘musts,’ if even for a short time. We must allow ourselves the time to experience nature, to have adventures, to create new memories. And we must remember to do it as soon as it’s possible for us. We must make the time for it. Too often, I feel a spark of inspiration to do something unusual, something enjoyable, something that someone else has recently done to which I feel a strong pull. Then, I stop myself at, “Maybe someday…” When I arrive at Someday, I inevitably forget why I wished to do what I wished to do. I forget about the spark of inspiration, the excitement I felt in the moment. I am reminded of the pure delight that arises from spontaneous decisions vs. carefully planned ones. So, why not make Someday happen today?

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I would love to read about your most memorable adventures. Please feel free to share your story in a comment.

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I started knitting a honeycomb stitch cowl neck (the pattern is free over here) in early December, using beautiful three-ply chunky wool yarn in a gorgeous raspberry shade that I purchased from a charming farm-based shop called The Philosopher’s Wool, located in Inverhuron, Ontario. We chanced upon the store while cruising around the countryside during our stay at a nearby cottage last summer. I love knitting cowls and have a small collection of them in my wardrobe. I keep coming back to them because a) they are quick to knit, b) fun, and c) can really showcase the yarn and the stitch used.

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I used to knit larger pieces and have a few favourite sweaters in my wardrobe that I made for myself. However, these days I prefer to knit accessories. The reasons for this are: a) a sweater would take me probably about a year to complete, since I don’t currently have enough time to dedicate to the activity and b) I’m working on making my wardrobe more minimal. From a practical perspective, I don’t need many hand-knitted sweaters, but I love to play up an otherwise grey, brown, and black outdoor winter wardrobe with splashes of colour and pretty accessories.

Since early December when I first started working on the cowl, having spent those 30-60 minutes per week on the project and completed it on March 8th, I would estimate that the project took me a total of eight hours to complete. This estimation is solely done for entertainment purposes, as I don’t usually count the number of hours a project requires. Instead, I choose interesting projects on which I enjoy working, and for which I can use gorgeous yarn.

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You may notice the pattern is for a longer cowl that can be wrapped around the neck twice. I chose to make it shorter, simply because I prefer shorter cowls that showcase the stitches. Since I used chunky three-ply wool, the stitch on my cowl is more open than in the original photo. I also used a cable needle to knit this piece, but you can get away with a third straight knitting needle, if you wish.

I’m curious… Do you have a project (and it doesn’t have to relate to knitting) to which you don’t have a lot of time to dedicate, yet you persist to work it into your schedule whenever possible? How do you stay motivated?

In other news…

Now that the weather is a bit warmer and spring is trying to make its way over the threshold, Pawel has been working in the garage workshop again, creating new pendants. This is the latest piece, to be added to our website within the next few days:

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Over the winter, Pawel has been daydreaming of sandy beaches, but since we haven’t had a chance to travel, he has been living vicariously through our travelling family members and friends. In lieu of the usual souvenirs — and sometimes alongside a few treats — they have been bringing back small samples of sand for us. Pawel has been taking macro photographs of the sand and creating a map of the sand’s origins.

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The sand project is a work-in-progress, so check back to see various new photographs of samples that Pawel will add to the site as he receives them from generous world travelers.