I promised to teach you to knit. So, allow me to begin by sharing our first instructional knitting video in a series of three. In this week’s video, I provide you with a quick tip for choosing the perfect yarn for your first project, show you my favourite cast-on method and teach you the basic knit stitch using the Continental method of knitting. If you have any questions, please do leave a comment below.

In the second video, to be released on Oct. 17th, I will show you the purl stitch, the lovely sister of the knit stitch. In the first video of the series, to be released on Oct. 24th, I will show you a few variations with the knit and purl stitches, to allow you to play and practice, and teach you how to cast off your first project. To be the first to receive an update in your email inbox as soon as the video is released, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Over the past weekend, unfortunately, I did not have an opportunity to spend much time on my knitting projects. That was the case for a couple of reasons: (1) Thanksgiving dinner and (2) preparing for an upcoming craft show.

We hosted Thanksgiving this year. Usually, Pawel’s parents host the dinner at their home, but I decided to take on the pleasure this year. I realized this weekend that it was a good decision, as our younger child was feeling under the weather and we wanted to stay close to home, instead of having to drive for 45 minutes there and back.

In any case, our family in Canada is small, and since my parents had a prior commitment and my sister celebrated Thanksgiving with her partner’s family, it was just the four of us, Pawel’s parents, and Pawel’s sister.

DSCN4167

We had a lovely dinner for seven people, if I do say so myself. 😉 Here are the photos of the dishes I prepared:

DSCN4171

Butternut squash, pumpkin and cranberry soup. The cranberries were an intuitive last-minute addition to the soup and I must say, the tart fresh cranberries mingled well with the sweet taste of the pumpkin and squash.

DSC_0720

Field greens salad with apples and fennel, with a dressing that I whipped up intuitively. The secret ingredient was raw honey.

DSC_0727

Roasted harvest vegetables.

DSC_0729

Roasted brussel sprouts. These are a favourite of mine and I could eat them as a snack anyday! If you have never tried roasting brussel sprouts, simply toss washed and halved brussel sprouts (with the core trimmed and the outer leaves removed) with EVOO or coconut oil and sea salt. Spread them evenly on a lightly greased baking sheet and bake for about 30 minutes in a preheated oven at 400F, turning them once after the first 15 minutes. If you are a fan of kale chips, you will probably like this dish.

DSCN4170

Slow-cooked lamb roast with cranberry sauce on the side. My mother-in-law always prepares turkey for Thanksgiving, and although we love it, I wasn’t in the mood for turkey this year. Lamb is a big favourite of ours and the cranberry sauce paired beautifully with it.

10408621_723068577775508_5063203241043939751_n

And of course, apple and cranberry pie for dessert. Although I love pumpkin soup, roasted pumpkin, and make great pumpkin spice muffins, I have never enjoyed pumpkin pie. It’s just not my favourite. Instead, we go for apples and cranberries in this delicate flaky pastry.

You may be wondering about whether I followed my usual Ayurvedic eating and food combination rules with this meal. The answer is no, because I do believe that it’s okay to venture off our usual path every once in a while. Instead, I focused on cooking and baking with love and chose the best ingredients while allowing my intuition to guide me to play with a few flavour combinations. The result was a good one for our taste buds and for our bellies.

And now, we’re back to preparing for the Made by Hand Show, to be held next weekend in Mississauga. We will showcase several items that have never been featured on our website.

DSCN4179

We have new inlaid pendants for you.

DSCN4185

And earrings!

Come see us on Oct. 18th and 19th at booth 110.

Wishing you a great week!

Katia

Dharma Wanderlust

 

 

I have tried to be the perfect modern yogi, trying to grow my hair, wearing Birkenstocks (I do like them, but they aren’t the most flattering or dressy shoes, in my opinion), and sticking to a Paleo diet. Somewhere along the line, within the past 16 years of my yoga practice, I had absorbed the idea that to be a good yogi, I needed to fit the perfect Instagram image of a yoga girl and that to inspire others, I needed to live up to a certain lifestyle stereotype.

Over tea with a dear friend this afternoon, I confessed this to her, adding, “Really, I love drinking lattes with real dairy milk, not almond milk or soy milk lattes. I love eating dessert with real sugar from time to time and I don’t want to give up my favourite crème brûlée. I sometimes eat too much chocolate.” Deep breath. Let it out. Phew.

My friend was not in the least surprised. “Of course,” she said, “you’re a European girl.”

I’m curious to know about the lifestyle of European yogis, though I have heard that the health craze is not as strict in Europe as it is in North America. I have never been to a studio in Europe — it’s been six years since I last traveled to Europe — but I’m curious. I love real coffee and dessert. I had given it up for a short while, just as I attempted to give up gluten. I also gave up dairy for a while. Yet, I soon realized that my approach to healthy diet and exercise was an ‘all or nothing’ approach that stemmed not from within, from the desire to feel better in my body. Instead, it stemmed from the ubiquitous stigma that certain foods are ‘clean and good’ and others are ‘bad for us.’ Because of this, if I allowed myself to slip and eat a sweet pastry one day, the following day all my diet rules would go right out the window.

Ayurveda has been the perfect approach for me and I learned how to eat best for my constitution, how to best honour my body, when to eat my most substantial meals (breakfast and lunch) and how to eat a light dinner, as well as which food combinations to avoid. Nevertheless, though I know that it’s never a good idea to mix two different types of protein, I still love St. Julien cheese with its beautiful walnuts in the creamy centre. I eat that particular cheese probably once a year (also because it’s not cheap), but I enjoy it to the maximum. Nowadays, I’m trying to take a more balanced approach to nutrition, eating healthy foods 90 per cent of the time and allowing myself treats on occasion. I eat a bit of dark chocolate every afternoon while taking a short siesta, but I allow myself dessert with real sugar (gasp) once a week. Sometimes, I even drink a bit of wine. I don’t drink green juices and smoothies in the colder months and only enjoy them in the summer. I don’t use protein powder because I’m wary of anything over-processed, and that includes what the health world considers to be good for us. I make my own diet rules. I eat real food, made with real ingredients. I use olive oil, coconut oil, ghee and yes, butter. I eat real bread from time to time, slathered with organic peanut butter. Some mornings, when I want to take a break from my usual steel-cut oats, toasted bread with peanut butter is the best complement to a latte made with organic 2% milk (there’s the dairy and nut protein combo again).

I do take Ashwaganda and a few other supplements that could be featured in an article or video titled Sh*t Crunchy Girls Say. Yes, I do some crunchy things and eat typical ‘yogi’ foods. I do enjoy Ezekiel sprouted grains bread and happen to go crazy for a splash of almond milk in tea or when it’s used as a base for smoothies in the summer.

The bottom line is that I will continue to make my own rules, listen to my body and its needs every day, and choose wisely… Most of the time. I will continue to fine-tune the way I eat and my approach to nutrition. I believe most of us need to continue to make small changes to our diet and the way we eat, in general.

Now, here’s a truly healthy simple, vegan (unless you do choose to add the chicken breast mentioned at the end), gluten- and dairy-free, and (I think) guilt-free recipe that I’d like to share with you…

recipe1

I love roasted root vegetables for their sweet taste and grounding effect. For the Vata season, roasted vegetables are my go-to recipe.

DSCN4117

Aren’t beets absolutely gorgeous? I’m in awe of their stunning colour.

Ingredients

2 sweet potatoes

3 beets

1 red bell pepper

1 tbsp melted coconut oil

1 tsp coarse sea salt

1 tsp dried oregano

1 onion, sliced lengthwise

1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds

DSCN4120

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 400F.

2. Coarsely chop the sweet potatoes, beets and peppers and place in a baking pan. Pour the melted oil over the vegetables, sprinkle with the sea salt and oregano, and stir. Bake for 45-60 minutes or until the vegetables are soft.

3. At medium-high heat, stirring constantly, toast the pumpkin seeds. Remove and set aside to cool. TIP: The seeds will continue to toast if they remain in the hot pan, so it’s best to pour the seeds out into a separate bowl.

DSCN4125

4. Using a small amount of coconut oil, toss the onions at medium-high heat until they are soft and golden-brown in colour.

DSCN4127

5. To plate, serve the roasted vegetables with the onions and seeds on top.

DSCN4129

If you prefer meat to plant-based protein, omit the seeds and place grilled chicken breast pieces on top of the vegetables.

DSCN4130

The result is delicious and satisfying.

Enjoy, and let us know what you think!

We are curious to know about your approach to healthy nutrition, so leave us a comment with your opinions.

Until next time,

Katia

Dharma Wanderlust

 

Does it not feel as though this year is just zooming right past us? Here we are, in October, and just this evening, as I was putting my summer clothes away for the colder months, I realized how quickly the seasons appear to be transitioning this year. Thankfully, Pawel and I were able to make the most of the summer months, starting with backyard barbecue dinners in early May, camping during the last weekend in May, and many other interesting daytrips and getaways all through until the end of August. And although the month of October is my favourite month of the fall season, I know that it, too, will make a swift grand exit. Hey, at least we’ll get to say goodbye while dressed in costume!

Since this is one of my favourite months of the year, I am determined to make the most of it. I will continue to explore all the luxuries of this beautiful golden month; I will continue to create; and I will seek to be inspired every day in order to inspire others. It feels as though this year has been a roller coaster ride for many, and we all deal with challenges. Yet, I want to make life sweeter. Every day. Who’s coming with me?

To go along with the above theme, I will share with you a recipe for a fantastic sweet and heart-warming soup. I first experimented with this soup two winters ago and its simple and delicious flavour brought me home to comfort.

Pinterest

Sweet Potato and Carrot Soup

Ingredients:

2 medium-large sweet potatoes or yams

1 tbsp butter or ghee (to make the soup vegan, you may use EVOO or coconut oil)

1 large white or yellow onion, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

4 medium carrots, chopped

7 cups vegetable stock or water

1 tsp sea salt

1 tsp turmeric powder

2 bay leaves

1 tsp cinnamon (optional)

DSCN4037 DSCN4043

Method:

1. Wash and bake the sweet potatoes for about an hour at 350F (preheated oven). Using a fork, pierce the potatoes to ensure that they are soft enough. Allow the sweet potatoes to cool before peeling them and chopping into 1-inch cubes.

DSCN4035

2. In a heavy-bottom cooking pot, melt the butter / ghee / oil on medium-high heat. Add the chopped onion and minced garlic and cook for a few minutes on medium heat, until golden and soft.

DSCN4039

3. Add the chopped sweet potato and carrots to the pot and continue cooking for about five minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Stir in the salt, turmeric, bay leaves, and cinnamon (if using). Continue cooking for another minute, stirring constantly.

DSCN4044

5. Add the vegetable stock or water and bring to a boil. Then, cover the pot and allow to simmer for about 30 minutes.

6. Allow the soup to cool. Then, discard the bay leaves, and puree in batches in a standing blender or use an immersion blender. The consistency should be completely smooth.

7. Serve and enjoy!

DSCN4048

I served this soup for lunch last week with a sprinkle of black sesame seeds. On the side are two mini pitas with avocado and sea salt on top, with baby spinach, homemade sour cabbage and carrot slaw, and a drizzle of EVOO.


 

Come visit us!

Pawel and I are thrilled to have a booth at the Fall Made by Hand Show on October 18th and 19th at the International Centre, Mississauga. We will showcase our wooden jewellery, wine bottle stoppers, and belt buckles.

If you are in the Toronto area, visit this wonderful show to purchase unique handmade products. It’s a great opportunity to start your Christmas shopping early. We will be at booth 110 and look forward to meeting many of our clients there.

Best wishes for a colourful and sweet first week of October,

Katia

Dharma Wanderlust

 

Whenever one of us is not in the workshop making jewellery, or running around with our children, we experiment with other types of creations. We are particular about healthy, nutrient-rich, delicious food. From time to time, we will share fabulous recipes we find (and customize in our kitchen) with you.

For Mother’s Day about a month ago, Pawel gifted to me Gwyneth Paltrow’s new cookbook, It’s All Good. I have been cooking, baking, and blending my way through the book and am very impressed with its contents.

Photo courtesy of eater.com

 

Over the past year, I have successfully implemented an elimination diet to heal inflammation and allergies that I had experienced for many years. This book features recipes that support the elimination diet and is an excellent resource for anyone interested in fine-tuning their menu, as well as for anyone simply interested in good, clean food and playing with new recipes.

The other day, I baked the sweet potato and five-spice muffins featured in the book, modifying the recipe slightly as I went along. These nutrient-rich muffins are gluten-free and are excellent with a bit (or a lot, if you’re a nut butter nut like me) of nut butter or coconut oil.

Ingredients (I added my personal notes in italics in brackets):

• 1 large sweet potato (I used two medium sweet potatoes)
• 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil (I used melted coconut oil)
• 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk
• 3/4 cup maple syrup or xylitol, plus 2 extra tbsp for brushing the muffins

(I used maple syrup and skipped the brushing step, as I barely had enough syrup to make 3/4 cup. In fact, I only had about a 1/4 cup of the syrup, so I used coconut sweetener, mixed with the almond milk and maple syrup, to make up the 3/4 cup of sweet liquid).

• 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
• 2 cups gluten free flour (if the flour doesn’t include xanthan gum, add 1 tsp)
• 2 tsp baking powder
• 2 tsp baking soda
• 1 ½ tbsp Chinese five-spice powder (I used 1/2 tsp of cinnamon, 1/4 tsp of all spice, and 1/8 tsp of nutmeg)
• ½ tsp fine sea salt

Here is how they’re made, with instructions copied from the book. I added my personal notes in italics in brackets:

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Prick the sweet potato a few times with a paring knife or a fork and bake in the oven until soft (when a paring knife can cut through with zero resistance), about 1 hour. Remove from the oven and set the sweet potato aside until it’s completely cool.

Peel the sweet potato, discarding the skin, and mash the flesh in a mixing bowl with a fork. Whisk the olive oil, almond milk, maple syrup or xylitol, and vanilla into the sweet potato. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, five-spice powder, and salt. Fold the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients.

Image

Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners and evenly distribute the muffin batter among the cups. (I used a small amount of melted coconut oil to grease the muffin tin).Image

Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean, brushing the tops with the extra maple syrup during the last 5 minutes of baking. Let the muffins cool before serving. (The temperature of my oven is usually true to norm, but these muffins were ready after about 16 minutes).

Et Voila!

Image

Happy baking!

XO,

Katia

(Dharma Wanderlust)