My grandmother is and always has been a talented knitter. She also used to crochet, cook marvelous meals and bake desserts from scratch while conserving every last little morsel of each ingredient and putting it to good use in feeding our family. Seated in the living room and reading books or watching a favourite cartoon, I used to observe in fascination her long fingers as they moved elegantly on the two needles that clicked almost melodically, all the while producing an intricate pattern out of a mere strand of woolen yarn, creating sweaters to keep us warm through the winter season. Enchanted with this magical, alchemical process, I begged her to teach me to knit. And so, on a cold afternoon in early January, my grandmother sat down with impatient five-year-old me, attempting to teach me the knit stitch using the Continental method. That episode ended in tears, but I never gave up.


Necklace handcrafted by Mr. Wanderlust.

Two years later, after moving to live in a different country with my parents and sister, I walked into a local stationery store that also stocked a small selection of needles and yarn on a demure shelf. Immediately, I was seized with longing memories of my Babushka, and my mom purchased the materials for me: red acrylic yarn and golden metallic 8 mm needles. I continued to practise every day, or whenever I missed my dear grandmother. When she visited us, three years later, I was ready for her to teach me the purl stitch and continued to make and unravel simple scarves for the next few years, whenever Nostalgia paid a visit to me. Those scarves were peppered with missed stitches and other blatant errors in spots where I should have purled instead of knitting. Having tried numerous times and become frustrated with the cast-on method Babushka taught me, I created my own cast-on technique; although it wasn’t the easiest technique, at the time, it served its purpose and allowed me to start making yet another red acrylic scarf.


We moved once more since then, and many years later, while in undergrad, I discovered that knitting had somehow become a chic hobby. I became a bit bolder in telling my peers that knitting is one of my hobbies. With a skip in my step, I returned home from several shopping trips to the bookstore, giddy about learning new techniques from the ‘how to’ books, ready to move beyond making scarves using dollar store acrylic yarn. I continue to refer to those books for tips on stitches and techniques that remind me that, although I may be an intermediate-level knitter, I’m still a beginner in some respect. I’m comfortable with that notion.

Today, in-between work and family responsibilities, I am fortunate to spend just 30 minutes per week with my yarn and needles, usually while watching a family movie with Wanderlust Juniors. I hope that for my children, the scarves and hats I make for them will continue to keep them not only warm in the snowy winter months but will also remind them that love often shows up in the smallest details, in the finest stitches. Love is spherical, moving beyond time and generations, knitting together stories and memories that culminate in one special piece gifted selflessly to someone special. To me, that is the definition of magic.

Do you knit? How did you learn? Please share your story by leaving a comment, below. Thank you, also, for sharing this blog with a friend! 

I promised to teach you to knit. So, allow me to begin by sharing our first instructional knitting video in a series of three. In this week’s video, I provide you with a quick tip for choosing the perfect yarn for your first project, show you my favourite cast-on method and teach you the basic knit stitch using the Continental method of knitting. If you have any questions, please do leave a comment below.

In the second video, to be released on Oct. 17th, I will show you the purl stitch, the lovely sister of the knit stitch. In the first video of the series, to be released on Oct. 24th, I will show you a few variations with the knit and purl stitches, to allow you to play and practice, and teach you how to cast off your first project. To be the first to receive an update in your email inbox as soon as the video is released, be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Over the past weekend, unfortunately, I did not have an opportunity to spend much time on my knitting projects. That was the case for a couple of reasons: (1) Thanksgiving dinner and (2) preparing for an upcoming craft show.

We hosted Thanksgiving this year. Usually, Pawel’s parents host the dinner at their home, but I decided to take on the pleasure this year. I realized this weekend that it was a good decision, as our younger child was feeling under the weather and we wanted to stay close to home, instead of having to drive for 45 minutes there and back.

In any case, our family in Canada is small, and since my parents had a prior commitment and my sister celebrated Thanksgiving with her partner’s family, it was just the four of us, Pawel’s parents, and Pawel’s sister.


We had a lovely dinner for seven people, if I do say so myself. 😉 Here are the photos of the dishes I prepared:


Butternut squash, pumpkin and cranberry soup. The cranberries were an intuitive last-minute addition to the soup and I must say, the tart fresh cranberries mingled well with the sweet taste of the pumpkin and squash.


Field greens salad with apples and fennel, with a dressing that I whipped up intuitively. The secret ingredient was raw honey.


Roasted harvest vegetables.


Roasted brussel sprouts. These are a favourite of mine and I could eat them as a snack anyday! If you have never tried roasting brussel sprouts, simply toss washed and halved brussel sprouts (with the core trimmed and the outer leaves removed) with EVOO or coconut oil and sea salt. Spread them evenly on a lightly greased baking sheet and bake for about 30 minutes in a preheated oven at 400F, turning them once after the first 15 minutes. If you are a fan of kale chips, you will probably like this dish.


Slow-cooked lamb roast with cranberry sauce on the side. My mother-in-law always prepares turkey for Thanksgiving, and although we love it, I wasn’t in the mood for turkey this year. Lamb is a big favourite of ours and the cranberry sauce paired beautifully with it.


And of course, apple and cranberry pie for dessert. Although I love pumpkin soup, roasted pumpkin, and make great pumpkin spice muffins, I have never enjoyed pumpkin pie. It’s just not my favourite. Instead, we go for apples and cranberries in this delicate flaky pastry.

You may be wondering about whether I followed my usual Ayurvedic eating and food combination rules with this meal. The answer is no, because I do believe that it’s okay to venture off our usual path every once in a while. Instead, I focused on cooking and baking with love and chose the best ingredients while allowing my intuition to guide me to play with a few flavour combinations. The result was a good one for our taste buds and for our bellies.

And now, we’re back to preparing for the Made by Hand Show, to be held next weekend in Mississauga. We will showcase several items that have never been featured on our website.


We have new inlaid pendants for you.


And earrings!

Come see us on Oct. 18th and 19th at booth 110.

Wishing you a great week!


Dharma Wanderlust



I was always the conscientious student throughout high school and university. I would manage all my assignments perfectly, planning for the entire semester after the first day of classes, to ensure that the rough copies of all my assignments would be completed well in advance of the dates on which they were due. That way, I had plenty of time to proofread them a few times and ensure that they were polished and as impeccable as they could be before handing them in. I stayed committed to one project at a time, working meticulously, and took pride in my work.

Several years later, as a crafty business owner, my true scatter-brained artist persona has emerged. I could blame it on my scattered lifestyle. After all, I do spend at least 12 hours a day taking care of two very busy and often rambunctious boys who keep me on my toes. But truth be told, I just decided to…



Many knitters will readily admit to having several work-in-process projects (WIPs) on the go at one time. I have been knitting regularly for the past 12 years and before now, managed to keep to one project at a time. Oh yes, I spent many hours knitting and purling while salivating over the next piece I was going to take on. But I abstained from pursuing it until the first one was complete. Perhaps it’s my INFP personality and Vata constitution that make me feel easily overwhelmed. But lately, I decided to set all Type-A organized behaviour aside and decided to let myself work on whatever I feel like pursuing at the moment.

That way, if I get bored of working on something and there’s pretty yarn in the corner that’s loudly calling my name, I can simply leave the original project aside and migrate to the new one.


A few of my current WIPs.

Sounds perfect, until I start to feel knitter’s remorse, for only a split second. I decided a couple of years ago to not allow myself to feel guilt over projects.

Besides, my straying never lasts very long. I just take short breaks to work on adorable projects, like these mukluk slippers that I knit for my older son. They only took about three hours to make, and he was excited to try them on. Here he is, modeling one of his ‘Harry Potter socks.’


And then, I get back to my ‘bigger’ projects with renewed enthusiasm. So, perhaps there might be a method to what feels to me like utter crafty madness.


Pawel also works on many woodworking WIPs at a time, and assures me that he definitely feels a bit overwhelmed with it all from time to time. So, at least we’re on the same page. 😉

We’d love to hear from you! If you’re a fellow crafter, let us know how many WIPs you work on at a time, and whether you also run into similar ‘dilemmas.’ Leave a comment and let us know!

P.S. I do not currently sell the items I knit. However, I am working on an exciting Dharma Wanderlust branch project that involves knitting and other passions of mine. We will inform you of it soon.


Dharma Wanderlust